Piano recital strikes right key with audience

The Performing Arts Center held its Fall Piano Recital on October 24, in the Music 2 building coordinated by Dr. Christina Eide, the piano instructor on campus.

“Generally we hold two piano recitals a semester, one mid-semester, and one at the end of the semester,” said Eide. “It is important for students to learn to deal with nerves and put their best foot forward.”

The event showcased an array of different pieces from Beethoven to Chopin. Each respective number was played on a Steinway and Sons grand piano, with the exception of Keenan Winkler, a 10-year-old cellist who performed six numbers by Johann Sebastian Bach.

“As an instructor, I count each successful performance as a victory for the student, and a chance to build more confidence in their abilities to perform,” said Eide. “The more often students perform for an audience the more comfortable they get in that situation.”

Winkler was one of the most accomplished musicians of the night, not only because of his age, but his astounding grace. The round of applause he received was well-deserved.

Following Bach’s tribute were other stellar performances from Monica Bolton, Kazue Balint and others. Some event went as far as to emulate Jerry Lee Lewis, traveling the length of the scale multiple times for that sort of ripple effect, which is not an easy feat.

Balint played a notable performance from Aaron Copland’s “Three Moods”, depicting two out of the three emotions: Embittered and Wistful. Embittered, as one would imagine, had a darker undertone, while Wistful had a lighter, more playful sound.

“While playing, I thought of frameless paintings I saw in an old cafe in New York,” said Balint. “I don’t really know how to describe it but there is beauty within them.”

The transition between the two pieces was almost unheard, so it was hard to tell where one mood stopped and the other started, but the performance was nonetheless another hit of the night.

Overall, the variety surrounding each performance was what made the recital so interesting to watch. Not everyone is a fan of Bach or Mozart, and the recital let that be known. Every performer brought something unique to the table, which, in the end, made for a better show.

“GCC is a well-kept secret for aspiring future musicians,” said Balint. “It has a wonderful studio class, performing arts center with a brand new concert grand and most importantly Dr. Eide and other wonderful faculty.”

2 Comments on “Piano recital strikes right key with audience”

  1. I refer to the Voice article by Tina Daquilante part of which I have copied at the foot of this message.

    In the article Tina refers to the late Jerry Lee Lewis.

    I am pleased to say that Jerry Lee Lewis is very much alive! As recently as September he was celebrating his 80th birthday with a sold out show at the most famous theatre in the World – The London Palladium.

    Jerry’s show was attended by a variety of other musicians including a Beatle and a member of Led Zeppelin and other stars paying homage.

    Jerry is still doing the piano raking sweeps at the keys that Tina’s article refers to – check them out at this link to his opening number at the Palladium.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiwVzPNdABw

    I am going to forward Tina’s article to Jerry. I hope Jerry reacts like Mark Twain did when he said “The reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated.”

    Tina’s original article includes:

    Following Bach’s tribute were other stellar performances from Monica Bolton, Kazue Balint and others. Some event went as far as to emulate the late Jerry Lee Lewis, traveling the length of the scale multiple times for that sort of ripple effect, which is not an easy feat.

    1. Oh wow, I apologize for the error! Duly noted. I had not realized I wrote that, nor that he was still raking sweeps! That is truly amazing. I have corrected that passage. Thank you for your interest in the story. My best to Mr. Lewis. I hope he has a good laugh at that.

      Tina

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